Camp Chewonki

cookies

Ranger Cookies

Why are they called ranger cookies? These cookies are said to have originated in Texas and were known as the “Texas Ranger Cookie”. They are also sometimes called Cowboy Cookies, especially with the addition of nuts. There’s no real reason for either of the names, except possibly because the cookies kept well in saddlebags and, thanks to the eggs, oats, and cereal, provided a bit of energy for long days in the field.

~ The Kitchen Team

Ingredients
  • 1 cup butter
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla
  • 2 1/2 cups ap flour
  • 4 cups rice krispies
  • 2 1/2 cups coconut
  • 1 cup chocolate chips
  • 1 cup dried cranberries or raisins
Directions
Preheat oven to 375 degrees

Step 1: Beat the butter and the sugar together, add the baking soda and powder and mix some more.

Step 2: Add egg and flour, and stir in the rest of the ingredients. The dough should be slightly dry and crumbly.

Step 3: Scoop onto a baking sheet and press the cookies flat.

Step 4: Bake for 8 minutes.

Campfire

Camp Chewonki December Newsletter

Dear Chewonki Families,

Winter is officially here in Maine and the holiday season is upon us! We love this time of year- time with family and friends, getting cozy inside or bundling up for trudging through the snow.

We’re very excited that this January we will be welcoming Chewonki families and friends to the Neck! It will be a fun opportunity to see camp in a very different state (hopefully with snow), reconnect with friends and participate in some winter activities. The Polar Bear Party is on Saturday, January 21st (event link below) and is open to any members of the Chewonki community – campers and their families, camp staff new and old alike, and families interested in joining the Chewonki community. If you have a friend who’s interested in joining you at Chewonki this summer, invite them to join you!

We hope to see as many of you there as possible.

From the entire Camp Chewonki family we wish a healthy and happy holiday season!

Best,

Katie & Jen

From the Neck

Traveling Natural History Program

Blue-Tongues Skink

We are delighted to properly introduce our newest animal ambassador to the Traveling Natural History Program, a young Blue-Tongued Skink by the name of Tilly!

Tilly is short for the scientific name of Tiliqua, and was named by an open vote across the Maine Coast Semester and Elementary Middle School students, as well as the Chewonki staff members. Blue-Tongued Skinks like Tilly get their name for their vibrant blue tongues, which can aid them in startling and evading predators.

Tilly originally came to us from HerpHaven, a rescue organization which takes in surrendered, sick or injured reptiles, rehabilitates them and helps to find them new homes. Tilly came from a home that loved him very much, but over-indulged him, feeding him to the point of being overweight. While many animals, like birds and mammals, use lots of calories to keep warm and therefore need more food to maintain their body weight, a cold-blooded critter like Tilly does not spend as much energy day to day, and it is much easier to accidentally overfeed.

Tilly came to Chewonki a few months ago, staying with us for an 8 week trial period, where we could allow him to acclimate to our wildlife center, and assess his comfort with being handled. The health and well-being of our resident ambassadors is important to us. They offer us the opportunity to engage with the public in a meaningful way, to promote kindness and curiosity, and empathy for the natural world. In return, we wish to offer them a feeling of safety and security, both in and out of their enclosures. If Tilly had shown a pattern of behavior indicative of stress or agitation while being handled during this trial, we would have found him a better home with HerpHaven, more suitable to his temperament.

Thankfully Tilly has adjusted well to his new environment and has been introduced to staff and students across the campus! We have officially transferred Tilly into our care, and look forward to many years of adventures ahead.

~ Traveling Natural History Team

From the Kitchen

Why are they called ranger cookies? These cookies are said to have originated in Texas and were known as the “Texas Ranger Cookie”. They are also sometimes called Cowboy Cookies, especially with the addition of nuts. There’s no real reason for either of the names, except possibly because the cookies kept well in saddlebags and, thanks to the eggs, oats, and cereal, provided a bit of energy for long days in the field.

~ The Kitchen Team

Ranger Cookies

cookies
Ingredients
  • 1 cup butter
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2  teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla
  • 2 1/2 cups ap flour
  • 4 cups rice krispies
  • 2 1/2 cups coconut
  • 1 cup chocolate chips
  • 1 cup dried cranberries or raisins 

Directions

Preheat oven to 375 degrees
Step 1: Beat the butter and the sugar together, add the baking soda and powder and mix some more.

Step 2: Add egg and flour, and stir in the rest of the ingredients. The dough should be slightly dry and crumbly.

Step 3: Scoop onto a baking sheet and press the cookies flat before baking at 375 degrees for 8 minutes.

Staff News

Staff Opportunities

Camp Chewonki has some exciting news – our applications for Summer 2023 are open!
To learn more about the different positions (or apply for the one that interests you most), visit our Employment page and fill out the short application.
The camp team is excited to answer any questions that you have, and talk about how AWESOME Summer 2023 will be. If you join our team, you can plan for a life-changing experience!

Staff Interview – Zoë Heard

Zoe Heard

Role at camp last summer? Previous Chewonki experience?
I was a Leader In Training/Cabin Leader last summer. I’ve been doing Chewonki wilderness expeditions since 2015 from the 10 day at Fourth Debsconeag all the way up to the 5 week George River Trip (it was not on the George when I actually did it though because of covid).

Favorite Summer 22 moment?
My favorite moment from last summer was probably getting to go back to Fourth Debsconeag with the Meadowlark cabin at the end of first session, it felt like coming full circle. We saw a double rainbow and it was pretty epic.

What have you been up to since camp?
Since camp I have started my first semester of college at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Good Day To Be A Tarheel!)

Favorite camp food or song?
My favorite camp song is probably “I Knew This Place” but I learned “Dancing With Bears” last summer, so now that’s a close second.

Favorite camp activity or game?
Favorite camp activity is always canoeing!

Tell us a fun fact camp folks may not know about you…
A fun fact about me is that I know more animals than people who share my name (the coolest, but not the nicest one being an Eurasian Eagle Owl).

From the Camp Office

Kayak

Reminders~

Follow Us on Facebook and Instagram!

Admissions / Enrollment

Greetings from the Admissions Office at Camp Chewonki. I hope everyone is enjoying time with loved ones during this busy season. It’s never too early to start planning your summers. It’s been nice to hear from so many of you. Enrollment for residential camp (ages 8-14) is strong and I predict we will be starting waitlists by the first of the new year for some age groups. If you’re thinking about a trip there is still decent availability. Due to high demand, we’ve added a second session Central Quebec Canoe trip.  There are great choices available! Please reach out if you have any questions.  

~ Leslie Hunter, Admissions

Where's Ginny?

DecGinny

Can you find Ginny? Ginny, chewonki mammal ambassador, will be hiding out in our feature picture each month. Submit your solution to atemple@chewonki.org. Can’t find her? We will share the solution in next month’s newsletter. Here is last month’s solution.

NovGinnySolved

Upcoming Events

muffins

Morning Glory Muffins

These muffins have been around since 1978 and are named for the restaurant where they were born, the Morning Glory Cafe, in Nantucket. In 1981 gourmet magazine printed the recipe, and in 1991 it was chosen as one of 25 favorite recipes from the last 50 years.

~ The Kitchen Team

Ingredients
  • 1 1/4 cup flour
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • generous pinch of salt
  • 1 1/4 cup shredded carrot
  • 1/3 cups raisins
  • 1/3 cups chopped seeds or nuts
  • 1/3 cup coconut
  • 1 cup chopped apples
  • 2 eggs beaten
  • 2/3 cup vegetable oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
Directions
Preheat oven to 350 degrees


Step 1: Grease or line a muffin tin.

Step 2: In a large bowl combine flour, sugar, baking soda, cinnamon and salt in a large bowl. Add carrot, raisins, seeds or nuts, coconut and apples. Mix well. Add eggs, oil and vanilla.

Step 3: Add the batter to your muffin tin filling each about 3/4 of the way.

Step 4: Bake for 20-25 minutes.

nature

Camp Chewonki November Newsletter

Dear Chewonki Families,

The leaves have fallen and the mornings are crisp here on Chewonki Neck. Outdoor Classroom has wrapped up for the semester and many of your beloved trip leaders and overnight camp staff who stayed around for the fall are heading on to their winter adventures.

We’re excited to announce that Excursion Days will be back in full force for Summer 2023! After two summers of staying on campus for Excursion Days to do fun-filled all-camp theme days, we’re going to venture out across Midcoast Maine twice a session. Similar to pre-covid Excursion Days, campers will have options to explore sites of interest related to Camp Chewonki’s main program areas. Campers will be able to choose between options like hiking nearby mountains/trails to practice orienteering skills, investigating Salt Marshes to gain natural history knowledge, or going strawberry picking to learn more about fruit farming. Our oldest campers will even have the opportunity to visit the beautiful Popham Beach for a relaxing day in the sun!

Do you know the origins of Excursion Days at Chewonki? Before we had cabins and yurts, campers and staff lived in tents. Once a week, everyone would leave the Neck so that the tents could be taken down, cleaned, and aired out. In fact, Excursion Days were originally called “Tent Day” ! It was the perfect excuse to learn more about our local area and connect with the Midcoast community, so even after we moved out of tents we kept the tradition going.

Camp Chewonki is lucky to be located in the gorgeous and fascinating Midcoast and we’re thrilled for campers to be able to see more of it this summer!

Best,

Katie & Jen

From the Neck

Salt Marsh Farm

carrots
wash station

This is a rich season on the farm, rich with nutrients, potential, and heavy totes of vegetables. Under the low light of these shortening days, the farmers are besmirching the pastures with last winter’s livestock manure, tending to the nutrient cycle of the farm. Farmers and students are wrapping up the final heavy harvests of the season, including carrots, beets, and winter radishes, and storing them in the root cellar below the Chewonki kitchen. Cows and sheep are moving into the spaces they’ll inhabit all winter, leaving the pastures until the grass starts to grow again next spring. There is plenty to do in every season; this particular time is focused on wrapping up the growing season. Many tasks feel like we’re giving ourselves presents for the future, like oiling and putting away tools and horsedrawn equipment and packing away the wash station. Come spring, we’ll find things ready to go (and grow!) again.

~ Megan and the Farm Team

From the Kitchen

These muffins have been around since 1978 and are named for the restaurant where they were born, the Morning Glory Cafe, in Nantucket. In 1981 gourmet magazine printed the recipe, and in 1991 it was chosen as one of 25 favorite recipes from the last 50 years.

~ The Kitchen Team

Morning Glory Muffins

muffins
Ingredients
  • 1 1/4 cup flour
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • generous pinch of salt
  • 1 1/4 cup shredded carrot
  • 1/3 cups raisins
  • 1/3 cups chopped seeds or nuts
  • 1/3 cup coconut
  • 1 cup chopped apples
  • 2 eggs beaten
  • 2/3 cup vegetable oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees
Step 1: Grease or line a muffin tin.

Step 2: In a large bowl combine flour, sugar, baking soda, cinnamon and salt in a large bowl.  Add carrot, raisins, seeds or nuts, coconut and apples. Mix well. Add eggs, oil and vanilla.

Step 3: Add the batter to your muffin tin filling each about 3/4 of the way and bake for 20-25 minutes.

Staff News

Staff Interview – Lachlan Nutting

staff

Role at camp last summer? Previous Chewonki experience?
Summer 2022 was my first season at Chewonki! I was one of the two Outdoor Living Skills (OLS) Activity Heads for camp. I worked with campers of all ages from Eastside and Westside, and taught them the skills they needed to be prepared for their wilderness trips. From building and starting campfires to cook, to processing wood, to learning about the principles of Leave No Trace, I wanted to help my campers feel more comfortable and self-sufficient in nature.

Favorite Summer 22 moment?
The Moose Moments! This summer, I conducted a research project with the campers to help me learn about and try to find a mysterious moose on Chewonki Neck! We never saw the moose, but we had so much fun exploring the Neck, and thanks to the help of some really enthusiastic Puffins and Owls, we got a (blurry) video of it!

What have you been up to since camp?
Since camp, I stayed at Chewonki as an Outdoor Educator in the Outdoor Classroom (OC) program! The Neck is full of Elementary and Middle School (EMS) and Maine Coast Semester (MCS) students, and new groups of students come in each week from schools from the area for Outdoor Classroom, so there is still a lot of wonderful hustle and bustle here. Never a dull moment on Chewonki Neck!

Favorite camp food or song?
My favorite camp song is “I Knew This Place” by David Mallett.

Favorite camp activity or game?
There are so many great games and activities! My favorite game is probably Kingdoms, but the Carnival Day always brings out the campers’ creativity in amazing, and absolutely hilarious, ways.

Tell us a fun fact camp folks may not know about you…
In 2013, when I was in high school, I competed with a team of classmates in the Mule Days packing competition in Bishop, CA. We entered the college division and won the title of World Champion Mule Packer for that division.

From the Camp Office

lighthouse

Reminders~

Admissions / Enrollment

Fall greetings from the Admissions Office! It’s been nice to catch up with our camp families over the past couple of months. The residential camp (ages 8-14) is filling nicely with a couple of age groups already tight on space. Traditionally at this time of year, there is still plenty of space on most of our leadership expeditions. Have you been in touch with your mates from this past summer? Maybe you’d like to get your own group together to hike the Appalachian Trail or kayak along the Maine Coast. There are great choices available! Please get in touch soon!

~ Leslie Hunter, Admissions

Where's Ginny?

trail

Can you find Ginny? Ginny, chewonki mammal ambassador, will be hiding out in our feature picture each month. Submit your solution to atemple@chewonki.org. Can’t find her? We will share the solution in next month’s newsletter. Here is last month’s solution.

Upcoming Events

Camp Chewonki October Newsletter

Hello Camp Chewonki Community,

We hope everyone’s school year is off to a great start! It’s hard to believe that it’s been over a month since the Second Session campers left Chewonki Neck. The trees are already starting to turn here and the Neck is filled with students from the Elementary Middle School, Maine Coast Semester, and Outdoor Classroom.

The year round camp team is already hard at work envisioning and planning for Summer 2023. We’ve collected feedback from camp families and staff and are in the process of meeting with the other amazing Chewonki departments that keep camp running smoothly in order to collect reflections on this past summer. We’re excited to share updates with you as we finalize plans through this newsletter every month!

I’m excited to report that overnight camp is already fifty percent enrolled for next summer! Some age groups are ninety percent full. We were thrilled to see so many applications from returning campers come flooding in and are starting to welcome applications from new campers. If you haven’t submitted your application for next summer, be sure to do so soon to save your spot! If you have any questions about enrollment, please feel free to reach out to Leslie Hunter in Admissions or the camp team.

Follow Camp Chewonki on Instagram or Facebook! After a little hiatus, the Camp Chewonki specific Instagram is back. We’ll be sharing highlights from the summer, snaps of the Neck as the seasons change, and share updates. You can follow the Chewonki Instagram for insights into all Chewonki programs.

Paddle and dip,

Katie and Jen

From the Neck

Salt Marsh Farm

Fall is a bustling season on the farm! With the help of Ted and Bob, our draft horses, we are clearing out gardens and putting in cover crops, whose roots will hold soil in place all winter and add to the fertility of the soil. Though he’s plenty busy on the farm, Bob also just took a trip off campus to the Common Ground Country Fair with Farm and Woodlot Manager Megan Phillips. Megan and Bob did demonstrations at the Fair about the relationship between horses and humans and how to safely engage in working with draft animals.

The farm crew and Chewonki students are bringing in large harvests for the kitchen as the temperatures grow colder and the days grow shorter. Cows and sheep are starting to dig into their winter hay ration as the grass growth slows. We saw our first frosts of the year this week, the pastures and gardens rimmed with a light layer for a few days in a row!

Traveling Natural History Program

Have you ever wondered why October is seen as such a spooky month? Why do we share scary stories, and give more focus to the ‘things that go bump in the night?

This time of year is one of transition, and sets up a peak opportunity for people and nocturnal animals to come into contact. The summer days begin to give way to the night, as the darkness arrives earlier and earlier, bringing nocturnal animals out sooner while people are still awake and finishing up their day. The trees spill down their leaves in a colorful splendor, which draws eyes to the woods, and also pulls back the usually thick green cloak of the forest, revealing hidden homes and haunts. And finally, fall is the harvest season – one last bounty before food grows very scarce in winter. Many animals are emboldened by their hunger, preparing for migration or a winter sleep, and it can bring them into new spaces as they search for resources.

This time of year The Traveling Natural History Program gets a lot of requests for Bat and Owl programs – to bring a little understanding and empathy to these children of the night. While we don’t currently have any ambassador bats, our aviaries are full of watchful owls, including the State’s smallest species, the Northern Saw-whet Owl!

Boo

Saw-Whet Owls get their name from their high-pitched call, a Pip! pip! Pip! or a “too too too..!” that some believe sounded like the sound of a Saw-blade being sharpened by a Whet-stone.

They are tiny, about the size of a large grapefruit, with cat-like faces and piercing yellow eyes. You’ll be hard pressed to spot one in the wild – their camouflaged feathers will blend into the trees they perch in, and those same feathers are built to make them silent in flight.

Haven and Boo

Can you spot our resident Saw-whet Owls, Haven and Boo? These two live together in our aviaries, a form of social enrichment and companionship. They are close to the same age – Caribou (or Boo for short!) being born in the spring of 2017, and Haven a year later in 2018. This species of owl will live about a decade in the wild (if they make it through their harrowing first year!). We expect them to live even longer lives with us, safe from the perils of the woods, such as hunger and predators.

Haven

Haven and Boo both came from Avian Haven, and they both share a past of head trauma, leading to a blindness in their right eye. Haven’s blind eye has even shifted in color over the years, giving him a strikingly unique look. Because of their partial blindness, they would have more difficulty landing perches and catching prey than other owls (a lack of depth perception). While we might send a one-eyed adult owl back into the wild after rehabilitation, both Haven and Boo were young, inexperienced owls that may not have had established territories. Their chance of survival was much higher as an educational ambassador, and we are happy to have them join our team!

SawWhet

From the Kitchen

We serve Baked Oatmeal on a regular basis and it is a favorite. We’ve made it with frozen sliced peaches as well. It is particularly good with a dollop of farm yogurt!

We also prepare an oatmeal bar that includes plain oatmeal with lots of toppings like, brown sugar, craisins, pumpkin seeds, chocolate chips, berries, etc.

~ Susan and the Kitchen Team

Baked Oatmeal

This recipe makes one 12 x 20 inch pan or two 9 x 11 pans.

Ingredients
  • 6 Cups blueberries (or other fruit)
  • 2 Cups honey (or maple syrup)
  • 8 cups oats
  • 1 Tbsp. + 1 tsp. baking powder
  • 1 Tbsp. + 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • pinch of salt
  • 8 Cups milk (½ gallon)
  • 8 eggs, beaten
  • 3 Tbsp vanilla extract
Baked Oatmeal

Directions

Preheat oven to 375 degrees

Step 1: Grease/spray a 2″hotel pan and sprinkle fruit across the bottom of the pan. Pour honey or maple syrup over fruit. Bake for 10 minutes.

Step 2: Combine dry ingredients in a large bowl. Combine wet ingredients in another large bowl.

Step 3: When fruit and honey have gotten warm and have been removed from the oven, give the pans a light jiggle to make sure the honey is all over the berries. Pour the dry ingredients over the fruit and honey and spread to evenly distribute. Lastly, pour the liquid mixture over the dry.

Step 4: Bake for 30 minutes

From the Camp Office

Reminders~

Admissions / Enrollment

Summer 2023 is now open for enrollment!

Where's Ginny?

Can you find Ginny? Ginny, our newest mammal ambassador, will be hiding out in our feature picture each month. Submit your solution to atemple@chewonki.org. Can’t find her? We will share the solution in next month’s newsletter. Here is last month’s solution.

Upcoming Events

2023 Age Groups update

2023 Age Groups Update

Dear Chewonki Families,

We hope the start of the school year is going smoothly! In just a few weeks Chewonki Neck transitioned from camp back into school mode as the campus for Chewonki’s Elementary and Middle School and Maine Coast Semester program.

As you’ve seen in our previous re-enrollment reminder emails, Camp Chewonki has made some changes to our age groups for Summer 2023 (also listed below). We decided to make these changes for a couple of reasons, which we’d like to share with you.

Changes to Camper Age Groups

First, we are moving towards more distinct age groups overall, which means that campers will be in cabins with campers their age (or very close). In previous summers, we’ve been a bit more relaxed on the age spread in a cabin or age group in order to accommodate as many campers as possible. We found, however, that age range within a cabin significantly impacts group dynamics and group management by the counselors.

Here are the new camper age groups:
  • Puffins – Ages 8-10
  • Owls – Ages 10-11
  • Herons – Ages 12-13
  • Ospreys – Age 14
  • Loons – Ages 14-16
  • Canada Geese – Ages 15-17
  • North Stars – Ages 16+

Tightening up age restrictions in age groups allows us to set campers up for strong connections with their peers and to enable counselors to manage a group as developmentally the same as possible. Please note that within the Owl and Heron age groups there are actually two sub-age groups with different trips. So while your camper may be an Owl as a ten-and-eleven-year-old, they will participate in two different trips which build on each other.

Changes to Program Length

Adjusting age groups also meant that we had to make some tough decisions regarding which campers will participate in the 10-day or 3-week program. In order to meet the above goal and keep campers on trips that are developmentally appropriate, Camp Chewonki will have 9-year-olds in the 10-day Puffin program and eleven-year-olds in the 3-week program. The 10-day Puffin program is designed to be an introductory experience to sleepaway camp and we know this shift will help campers thrive in the appropriate program for their age and overall camp experience. We strongly encourage 10-year-old campers who attended Chewonki as 8 or 9-year-olds (or both!) to move up to the 3-week program for their 10-year-old summer.

Changes to Osprey Age Eligibility

The final change we made is in regards to Ospreys, our oldest age group. Previously, campers ages fourteen and fifteen were able to enroll as Ospreys. This summer and moving forward, the Osprey age group will be just for fourteen-year-olds. Fifteen-year-old campers have the opportunity to participate in any of our exciting Loon Trips. Again, this decision was informed partially by the initial age refinement goal and to satisfy the particular goal of the Osprey program itself. As we’ve seen over the years at Chewonki and as I’ve found throughout my own camping experience, the final year of in-camp programming is really special and important for campers. We want to build the Osprey summer into a unique experience for the campers who’ve been at Camp Chewonki that will enable them to share their experience of camp with others and enjoy some different opportunities. Going through the same program twice can diminish the specialness of that experience. We also know that by their Osprey summer, campers have amassed some incredible tripping experiences and skills. We’re excited that they can carry that into the next phase of their Camp Chewonki career into Loon Trips that allow them to specialize in the aspect of tripping that stood out to them most, whether that be backpacking, canoeing, or kayaking.

If you have any questions about how these changes will impact your camper, please reach out to us. We’d be happy to talk through any specific questions or situations.

Remember to enroll by September 15th in order to claim your spot before we open enrollment to new campers and siblings on the waiting list. Camp Chewonki filled up fast last summer and we are happy to keep enrollment closed to just returners while we can.

Best,
Katie & the Camp Team

Camp Chewonki June 8 Newsletter

From the Camp Office

Hello camp families!

We wanted to share some information about arrival and departure days.

Arrival Days
We are excited to see campers on our Arrival Days! In order to keep the community safe heading into both sessions of camp, we are going to keep drop-offs short. We’ll be sharing a map that will walk you through the drop off process so you and your camper know what to expect. You will also receive a confirmation email 72 hours in advance of your arrival to confirm the arrival plan we have for your camper.

As indicated in the travel form you filled out in CampInTouch, arrivals will be between 12:30-3 pm. Please plan on arriving within a half hour of the time you indicated on your form and anticipate there may be a line as we get everyone through the drop off process. Families will have 10 minutes to say your goodbyes at the drop off point, so we highly encourage you to have your big goodbyes prior to drop off. It can be really helpful for campers and families to mark their departure to camp before the actual drop off. Families will be asked to stay masked outside of their vehicles during drop off and campers will be masked as they move through the check-in process and can unmask when they are dropped with their cabin group.

We understand that this is a stricter policy than current CDC recommendations, but we are making our best effort to keep COVID out of our camp community and ensure a healthy staff as we head into camp. We appreciate your understanding and cooperation while on campus!

Departure Days
We are excited to bring back an on-campus departure day! Assuming COVID rates stay as is or improve, we will be welcoming families onto Chewonki Neck for departure day.
Departure day will run from 9 am to 12 pm. After meeting up with your camper, we’ll be offering tours around camp. At 10 am we’ll have sample activity periods for families to join to see the camp experience first hand. At 11 am we’ll be offering snacks and having a brief campus meeting on each side of camp to hear from the Directors.
Please limit visitors to immediate family only. While we will keep all activities outdoors, please bring masks if you need to go into buildings to use the restroom. This plan is weather dependent. Again, you will receive an email 72 hours in advance confirming your camper’s departure plans.
For campers attending Puffin sessions 1a and 2a departure day will look different as camp will still be in session. We will email you with different plans for departure day.

Looking forward seeing you at camp.

~Katie

From the Health and Wellness Center

Dear camp families,

On May 19, 2022 the US CDC updated its recommendations for children 5-11 years old. This is an important new development with our vaccine requirements at Chewonki. Being fully vaccinated and up-to-date is going to ensure that each of our campers has the healthiest summer possible by decreasing the risk of a severe infection and/or hospitalization from COVID-19.

The CDC recommends a booster of Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for:

  • Most children, at least 5 months after the final dose in the primary series
  • Children who are moderately or severely immunocompromised, at least 3 months after the final dose in the primary series

If your child received their initial vaccine greater than 5 months ago please schedule a booster for them prior to camp.
Children are considered up to date and fully vaccinated once they have their booster dose. At this time the CDC is NOT recommending a 2nd booster for children.
Please reach out if you have any questions.
Best,
Angie

CampMeds

COVID Letter Template

Event Recordings

Homesickness and Camp

New Families Info Session

Where's Ginny?

Missing Ginny? Ginny will return for for the August issue.

water

Camp Chewonki June 1 Newsletter

Hello Camp Chewonki Families!

With the start of First Session just around the corner, the Camp Chewonki team is hard at work making sure everything is in line for June 26th! We’ve been meeting with all the amazing teams and people across Chewonki who make camp possible, double checking schedules to ensure every camper gets to experience all Chewonki has to offer, planning arrival day and special events, and more.

As you prepare for camp this summer, we wanted to share information about camp terms and topics that will definitely come up this summer!
Westside– Westside is what we call the campus for Camp Chewonki for Boys and Non-Binary campers. This is the primary title we use internally to refer to the camp and your group leaders will likely call themselves “Westside staff.”
Eastside– Eastside is what we call the campus for Camp Chewonki for Girls and Non-Binary campers. This is the primary title we use internally to refer to the camp and your group leaders will likely call themselves “Eastside staff.”
Chewonki Neck– Chewonki Neck is a 400-acre peninsula on Montsweag Bay and the location of Camp Chewonki. You’ll get to travel to different parts of Maine during your time at camp (more on that below), but Chewonki Neck is your primary home for your camp experience. Click here for a map of Chewonki Neck!
OLS– OLS is shorthand for Outdoor Living Skills. This is one of our main program areas where campers build their skills to thrive on their trip. During this program time, campers learn how to pitch a tent, safely build a fire, and more!
Community Building– Community Building is another main program area at Camp Chewonki that encompasses our low ropes and high ropes course and team building activities.
Chewonki Day– Chewonki Day is a special event day that happens multiple times in a session and is rooted in Chewonki’s primary values. The main event on Chewonki Day is Reflection in which each camp gathers to share their meditations on their camp experience. Campers will also participate in service projects, long-standing Chewonki games, and enjoy a sleep in!
Excursion Day– Back in the day, campers and staff at Camp Chewonki lived in tents, which would need to get cleaned and aired out weekly. On this “tent day” everyone would head out of camp to explore the Midcoast of Maine. Although we don’t live in tents anymore, we still enjoy a break from our regular programming with a special event day. Because of COVID, we’ve decided to not leave campus on this day, but instead we’ve created epic special event days for everyone to enjoy.
Cabin Trips– Each cabin at Camp Chewonki goes on their own trip out of camp to fully experience all Maine has to offer. You’ve already received information about your trip this summer. Each age group has a particular trip that they go on and as you spend more summers at Chewonki you continue through the trip progression, which culminates in canoeing the Allagash River your Osprey summer!

We are so excited to see you at camp soon!

~Katie 

From the Camp Office

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Coordinator Corner ~

We’re excited to introduce the Cabin Coordinators for Eastside and Westside camps this summer! Cabin Coordinators oversee one or two age groups and directly supervise the Cabin Leaders living in the cabin. They work closely with camp leadership to ensure campers receive all the support they need to have an amazing summer. 

Westside Cabin Coordinators

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Rebecca Salerno (Puffins)

Becca (she/her) is so excited to return for her second summer at Chewonki! During the school year, she leads after-school programs for elementary school students in Portland, ME, and in her spare time she loves days at the beach, ice cream, and finding hidden gems at antique sales. She can’t wait for another summer of Camp Chewonki magic!

coordinator

Ky Putnam (Owls)

Hi! My name is Ky and my pronouns are they/them. I’m a Bowdoin graduate with a degree in sociology and education. I’m passionate about rock climbing and campfire singalongs.

coordinator

Nathan Madeira (Herons & Ospreys)

My name is Nathan Madeira (he/him) and I am so excited to be at Chewonki for the summer! I am in my fifth year of teaching and can’t wait to get out on the water or go swimming this summer.

Eastside Cabin Coordinators

coordinator

Audrey Daigneault (Puffins & Owls)

Hi, my name is Audrey, and I use she/her/hers pronouns. For the last year, I was serving as a 3rd grade social studies and science teacher in Texas. My favorite outdoor activity is an ultimate frisbee!

coordinator

Patrice W (Herons & Osprey)

Hello, my name is Patrice. My pronouns are she/her. I am a student in Business Administration at American Intercontinental University. I am a abstract artist and I love to play all sports.

Photos at Camp - Introducing Campminder Campanion

We’re excited to introduce you to Campanion, the new mobile app we’re using to share your child’s camp experience at Camp Chewonki with you this summer.

From the Health and Wellness Center

Emotionally Preparing for Chewonki Summer Programs

Hello from the Chewonki Health and Wellness Center! It’s almost summer again and we are gearing up to welcome your kids to another exciting season with Chewonki. As we prepare, we know you and your family are also looking to prepare for amazing summer experiences.

Sometimes the transition between home and summer programming can be challenging for young people. Even experienced summer participants sometimes find it difficult to cope with all of the differences between their home lives and Chewonki lives. One of the best ways for participants to prepare for summer programming is to practice! Practice having novel experiences and practice having experiences that may be similar to summer program experiences.

It may seem silly to practice having novel experiences – especially when your young person is practicing for an experience (like camp or a trip) that is designed to be enjoyable. However, change can be, and frequently is an obstacle for children and adults alike. The human brain is very content with using unconscious automatic processes that allow us to move more quickly through our world without requiring us to consider each step of our day or each step of an activity. Doing things differently requires more emotional effort. This emotional effort can be tiring even when an experience is fun.

Practicing novel experiences can help you and your young person identify and get used to using methods that can help them cope with putting forth this extra emotional effort. It also can help them begin to think about and talk about novel experiences in a different way. For example, they may be able to tell themselves things like, “It’s ok if this is hard and fun at the same time,” or “I feel exhausted by new things sometimes and that is alright,” or even, “I know how to handle it when something new feels like a lot to me.” Some example novel experiences include: brushing teeth somewhere other than the bathroom, eating food that is not the normal brand, going somewhere new and adhering to expectations of that environment, not bathing on the expected day or at the expected time. These are only a few, so feel free to get creative!

Practicing, in order to get ready for camp or trip experiences, can help our brains get used to and develop comfort with some situations before being confronted with the need to cope with them for weeks. If a situation ends up being particularly difficult – this also gives you and your young person time to identify and practice using some coping skills and positive self-talk to better manage that situation. Some examples of things to practice include: sleeping away from home and caregivers, finding a few foods that are desirable when a meal is not a preferred one, carrying their own bags/things, using a flashlight to get to the bathroom at night, going to bed and getting up early, using compostable toilets or bathrooming in nature, swimming in a lake or salt water, and long walks. For more suggestions or information regarding camp and trip daily living, please contact us!

Practicing things before arrival at Chewonki also helps participants better manage homesickness. Practicing with novel experiences – even ones unconnected to camp or trips, can help young people learn coping skills and encourages reasonable expectations of themselves. Both of those things can support them when experiencing a bit of homesickness. Having experience with situations similar to summer programming can help a camper feel a bit less impacted by change which allows their minds to have more energy for coping when homesickness pops up. It also can help them experience a bit less sadness or worry about the temporary loss of their everyday home experiences.

Event Recordings

Homesickness and Camp

New Families Info Session

fun

Hiring for 2022

Do you have plans this summer?  We are looking for people that want to make a positive difference in a child’s life.  

 

Where's Ginny?

june

Can you find Ginny? Ginny, our newest mammal ambassador, will be hiding out in our feature picture each month. Submit your solution to summer@chewonki.org. Can’t find her? We will share the solution in next month’s newsletter. Here is May’s solution.

ginny

Photos at Camp – Introducing Campminder Campanion

We’re excited to introduce you to  Campanion , the new mobile app we’re using to share your child’s camp experience at Camp Chewonki with you this summer. With a personalized stream of content featuring photography, updates from camp, and more, our hope is that Campanion makes you feel closer to your camper’s experience than ever before.

To get started, follow these three simple steps:

  • Download the Campanion app on your smartphone
  • Login to the app using your Campminder Account login and password
  • Upload a reference photo of your child

Please note – the automatic face-finding feature only works for photos added after you have added a reference photo of your child, so please add one before they arrive at camp!

Let us know if you have any questions, and we look forward to sharing the experience of camp this summer!